Multidisciplinary Team

Histologic and molecular subtyping are important steps in the patient journey1-4

 

Histologic and molecular testing are becoming more complex; therefore, collaboration with the entire multidisciplinary team is critical for making timely and appropriate treatment decisions.1-4

 

The multidisciplinary team throughout the patient journey1

The multidisciplinary team throughout the patient journey1

Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC
  • Serves as navigator to help patients along their cancer testing and treatment journey
  • Helps clarify lab results and explain treatment to patient
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC

Oncologist2,5,6:

  • Orders PD-L1 mutation test and receives results
  • Discusses mutation test results with patient
  • Outlines treatment plan for patient

Biopsying Physician7:

  • Obtains tissue biopsy sample for biomarker testing
  • Sends sample to pathologist

Anatomic Pathologist3,8:

  • Analyzes tissue sample
  • Identifies tumor cells through histology
  • Makes histopathological diagnosis of type of bladder cancer
  • Determines if sample includes biomarkers, such as PD-L1

Technologist9:

  • Ensures that sample quantity and quality are appropriate for mutation testing
  • Performs PD-L1 mutation test

Lab Director8,10:

  • Oversees testing process
  • Sends report to oncologist
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC
Role of the multidisciplinary team in UC

Collaboration within the multidisciplinary team can ensure that critical factors, such as specimen type and turnaround time, are communicated for appropriate and efficient treatment of patients.1-4

PD-L1, programmed death-ligand 1.

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References: 1. Levy BP et al. Oncologist. 2015;20(10):1175-1181. 2. American Society of Clinical Oncology. http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/bladder-cancer/treatment-options. Updated December 2016. Accessed March 13, 2018. 3. American Cancer Society. http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/003085-pdf.pdf. Revised April 23, 2016. Accessed March 13, 2018. 4. Montironi R et al. Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2016;140(6):501-502. 5. Shaw AT et al. In: Govindan R, ed. American Society of Clinical Oncology 2011 Educational Book. Alexandria, VA: American Society of Clinical Oncology; 2011:292-298. 6. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Bladder Cancer V5.2018. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Accessed September 27, 2018. To view the most recent and complete version of the guidelines, go online to NCCN.org. 7. National Cancer Institute (NCI). https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/diagnosis-staging/diagnosis. Published March 9, 2015. Accessed March 13, 2018. 8. NCI. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/diagnosis-staging/diagnosis/pathology-reports-fact-sheet. Reviewed September 23, 2010. Accessed March 13, 2018. 9. Lindeman NI et al. Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013;137(6):828-860. 10. Fitzgibbons PL et al; College of American Pathologists Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center. Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2014;138(11):1432-1443. 11. NCI. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/coping/research/patient-navigation-and-nurses. Published July 24, 2012. Accessed March 13, 2018.